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In the midst of the silence - Český Krumlov

Krumlov Krumlov Creative Common BY-SA

In 1977, on the festival in Sopot, Helena Vondrackova sang a song about a jug from Krumlov Castle. Then, the Czech city became known to a wider audience, and today is totally besieged by tourists, who visit it in the summer.

There are places, where you can feel the history on every step. They are full of life, and at the same time seem like being suspended in time - just go to any of lazily winding streets, and see for yourself. Specific atmosphere is filled with the smell of coffee, muffled talks and silence of historic buildings towering over the city.

Český Krumlov is exactly this kind of city. It’s located at a distance of about 400 km from Ostrava, on the Vltava River. Back in the days, it housed a residence of the richest family in the Czech kingdom – the Rosenbergs. For more than five centuries the city had been developing, somehow avoiding the historical turmoil. Many building survived thanks to this, and were later inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List (in 1992).

Quadrupled guardian of the city

Český Krumlov was built around the thirteenth-century castle standing on a coastal rock. In the past, it protected the ford on the river, and today towers over the city, being also its biggest attraction. This set of royal buildings is the second largest (after Hradčany in Prague) Czech complex. It’s a must see while in town.

Before visiting the castle galleries, tourists will see something really rare - a moat with bears. It’s a hallmark of the city, and tourists repeatedly violate the ban on feeding them and just throw a lot of treats. After all, they must have enough strength to defend the castle - as in the past.

Baroque theater

After crossing the gates, eyes of visitors are welcomed with a number of beautiful historic buildings interspersed with equally comely courtyards. Eager to explore the nooks and crannies of the castle can choose from several available routes. They’ll see, among others, a ballroom with eye-catching decorative ornaments, as well as a very unique attraction – a Baroque theater. It’s one of the best preserved monuments of this kind in the world. It exists unchanged from 1766, and it still preserved the original lighting, curtain, costumes and scenes.

After a walk among the historic setting, it’s high time to climb the Castle Tower. The ticket costs 50 CZK. The top offers a magnificent view of the old city, connected to the castle by a small bridge. Later, you can change the perspective and sit on the original rotary auditorium. From here you can admire not only a fairytale castle gardens (they cover an area of ​​11 hectares), but also spectacles, which are held pretty often here.

A walk around Český Krumlov

The castle is undoubtedly the biggest, but not the only attraction of the city. After passing the bridge we will get to the old part, full of charming cafes and restaurants. Some of them are located in the old bourgeois homes, so in addition to haute cuisine, they offer a cozy interior decorated with an exquisite taste.

It’s worth to focus on a Town Hall and Gothic church of St. Vitus. Equally beautiful is Mariánský Sloup – a Marian column, built in the eighteenth century, in gratitude for the relief from plague.

If someone’s planning to visit Český Krumlovjust whenpassing by, and is looking for an accommodation near the city, may stop at Camping & Apartment Paradijs. It’s located about 6 kilometers east of Krumlov. Nightly accommodation costs 90-110 CZK (3,5 to 4,5 EUR), while parking space for motorhome - 80 CZK (Approx. 3 EUR). After the rest, you can move on to a meeting with other Czech monuments.

Translation: Karolina Strzałkowska

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