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Speed limits in France

Mandatory vehicle equipment in France

High Visibility Jacket High Visibility Jacket Mandatory use of high visibility jacket when leaving the vehicle during accident or breakdown by all passengers and driver 
First Aid Kit First Aid Kit  No regulations
Warning triangle Warning triangle  Required
Fire extinguisher Fire extinguisher  No regulations
Minimum tire tread depth Minimum tire tread depth  Summer tires (1,6mm), Winter tires (no regulations)
Winter tires Winter tires  No regulations
Snow chains Snow chains  Tire chain usage is permitted for hazardous weather only, but may not damage the road surface
Vehicle with trailer Vehicle with trailer  Extra side mirrors when width of trailer is higher than vehicle. Extra warning triangle
Spare light bulbs Spare light bulbs  Mandatory (for each light in the vehicle and trailer)
Breathalyser Breathalyser

Brathalysers are compulsory vehicle equipment since 1 July 2012 but the law was changed on 1 March 2013 and fines for not having alcotest in a vehicle were dropped.

Neil Greig, IAM director of policy and research, said: "The law for carrying breathalysers will no longer be enforced through fines, but in order to comply with the law we still recommend that you keep a breathalyser kit in the car whenever you're travelling to or through France."

Towing rope Towing rope  No regulations

Other regulations for drivers in France

Maximum permissible blood alcohol level Maximum permissible blood alcohol level 0,5‰ 
Use of day driving lights Use of day driving lights  Only during night and bad weather
Use of safety belts Use of safety belts  Required
Wild camping outside campsites Wild camping outside campsites  Allowed for one night on motorway parkings, streets and squares

Road tools and charges in France

  • No vignette
  • Toll relative to road section
  • Special tolls for tunnels, bridges, city tolls

Emergency telephone numbers in France

European emergency number 112
Roadside assistance +33 438 498 349

The information shown on this page is for informational purposes only.

In case of doubt, please note that priority is given to all traffic regulations applicable in a given country. CampRest is not responsible for the consequences of use of the information contained above.

 

Comments

Anonymous
2019.07.23 09:31
Another thing that Camprest should mention is CritAir: Many cities in France can either no longer be entered at all with diesel driven vehicles, or city administrations claim the right to close their city for dirty vehicles as soon as the whether conditions start to stimulate pollution and bad air quality. This can even be extended to complete départements: whole districts can be closed for the dirtiest categories of traffic as soon as the air quality becomes too bad. You are expected to buy a CritAir certificate, but the French government did not care to translate their website into many European languages. Furthermore, the CritAir certificate is only available online, so the French government is basically raising their middle finger towards people who have no access to internet, no credit card, or no ability or trust to order online. Even if your vehicle is clean enough, you will be fined if you drive through an area where the CritAir-certificate is mandatory, if you have not purchased a CritAir certificate. Ordering online can take 4 or 5 weeks, from payment till delivery. As a rule of thumb, do not trust just any website that is trying to help you. Get your information from reliable sources, who keep track of changes. Automobile clubs like ADAC (Germany), Touring (Belgium, Switzerland), AA Road Patrol (United Kingdom) and ANWB (Netherlands) are more reliable sources of information. From my personal experience I have to say though, that ANWB shop staff members have become more focused on selling clothes and know less about travelling than they did 25 years ago. Young staff members who cannot find a popular holiday destination on a paper map are no exception anymore in the days of satellite navigation, turning off our brains... >:-/
Anonymous
2019.07.23 09:14
France has lowered the general speed limit on national roads outside built-up areas from 90km/h to 80 km/h. The new speed limit came into effect in 2018. President Macron also sold the speed cameras to private companies. This is one of the reasons behind the movement of protesters who wear yellow security vests. Les gilêts jaunes claim that the Paris government does not understand the circumstances of living in rural areas in France. Please correct your speed limits, before your readers get their French speeding tickets sent to their homes.
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